I-980: Freeway to Neighborhood

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There have been many calls for the removal of the I-980 freeway between 20th St and 8th St in downtown Oakland. This vastly underutilized piece of automobile infrastructure occupies 46 acres with the potential to provide not only a dramatic increase in housing supply, but also to reconnect a historically disinvested West Oakland with the city’s core through a high quality pedestrian network and human scale public realm. The sunken elevation will reduce the cost of underground parking and the extension of a second Transbay Tube with a new BART stop reinforcing the energy of this new neighborhood. 

This is a vision of a reconnected Oakland.

 


46 Acres

2,051 New Apartments

354 New Townhomes

68,000 sq ft Retail

2 New BART Stations

3.3 Total FAR


Design Precedents

 

 

South Berkeley Specific Plan

 A proposal for the South Berkeley Specific Plan, presented to the City of Berkeley, CA, Spring 2015.  The southernmost point of Adeline Street's public right-of-way in Berkeley is wider than a football field. My proposal to the city included the transformation of this dramatic surplus of vehicle space into entirely new city blocks flanked by two smaller streets on either side. In addition to re-establishing a human scale to the area, the proposal would create approximately 290 housing units and 40 retail spaces. In fiscal terms, the transformation would turn an unnecessary maintenance expense into a net positive for the City of Berkeley through the sale of parcels and subsequent property taxes garnered.   Beyond the infill-block concept, my contributions to the larger proposal included the creation of a 3D model of South Berkeley, which allowed our team vastly greater flexibility in testing competing design concepts.    See full proposal here.

A proposal for the South Berkeley Specific Plan, presented to the City of Berkeley, CA, Spring 2015.

The southernmost point of Adeline Street's public right-of-way in Berkeley is wider than a football field. My proposal to the city included the transformation of this dramatic surplus of vehicle space into entirely new city blocks flanked by two smaller streets on either side. In addition to re-establishing a human scale to the area, the proposal would create approximately 290 housing units and 40 retail spaces. In fiscal terms, the transformation would turn an unnecessary maintenance expense into a net positive for the City of Berkeley through the sale of parcels and subsequent property taxes garnered. 

Beyond the infill-block concept, my contributions to the larger proposal included the creation of a 3D model of South Berkeley, which allowed our team vastly greater flexibility in testing competing design concepts.

See full proposal here.